“Her arresting face adorns postage stamps. Her name lends class to luxury condominiums. Her works are sold in subway vending machines.”

Blind pigs and blind tigers

The term “blind pig” (or “blind tiger”) originated in the United States in the nineteenth century; it was applied to lower-class establishments that sold alcoholic beverages illegally. The operator of an establishment (such as a saloon or bar) would charge customers to see an attraction (such as an animal) and then serve a “complimentary” alcoholic beverage, thus circumventing the law.

Etymology of turnpike

early 15c., “spiked road barrier used for defense,” from turn + pike (n.2) “shaft.” Sense transferred to “horizontal cross of timber, turning on a vertical pin” (1540s), which were used to bar horses from foot roads. This led to the sense of “barrier to stop passage until a toll is paid” (1670s). Meaning “road with a toll gate” is from 1748, shortening of turnpike road (1745).

  • Paris Review: Did you keep diaries when you were young?
  • Karl Ove Knausgaard: Yes, I did, but I burned them when I was twenty-five or twenty-six.
Data from Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/notes/facebook-data-science/the-formation-of-love/10152064609253859
“Our money, which had come from selling my car, ran out so quickly that it was as if someone had put a curse on it …”
— John Jeremiah Sullivan, “Ghost Estates”
“I sought trains; I found passengers.”
— Paul Theroux, The Great Railway Bazaar
Jean Zuber et Cie is the last manufacturer in the world to produce woodblock printed wallpapers and furnishing fabrics. Since its founding in 1797 by Jean Zuber, Zuber & Cie has maintained its headquarters at Rixheim, France. Jean Zuber’s wallpapers were so respected that King Louis Philippe honored him with the Legion of Honor in 1834.

Jacqueline Kennedy on recommendation of historian Henry Francis du Pont had an antique copy of the panoramic wallpaper Vue de l’Amérique du Nord,  installed in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House. The wallpaper had been on the walls of a parlor in the Federal period Jones House in Maryland until 1961 when the house was demolished for a grocery store. Just before the demolition, the wallpaper was salvaged and sold to the White House.
Zuber & Cie collection at Cooper Hewitt: http://collection.cooperhewitt.org/people/18043983/ Jean Zuber et Cie is the last manufacturer in the world to produce woodblock printed wallpapers and furnishing fabrics. Since its founding in 1797 by Jean Zuber, Zuber & Cie has maintained its headquarters at Rixheim, France. Jean Zuber’s wallpapers were so respected that King Louis Philippe honored him with the Legion of Honor in 1834.

Jacqueline Kennedy on recommendation of historian Henry Francis du Pont had an antique copy of the panoramic wallpaper Vue de l’Amérique du Nord,  installed in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House. The wallpaper had been on the walls of a parlor in the Federal period Jones House in Maryland until 1961 when the house was demolished for a grocery store. Just before the demolition, the wallpaper was salvaged and sold to the White House.
Zuber & Cie collection at Cooper Hewitt: http://collection.cooperhewitt.org/people/18043983/ Jean Zuber et Cie is the last manufacturer in the world to produce woodblock printed wallpapers and furnishing fabrics. Since its founding in 1797 by Jean Zuber, Zuber & Cie has maintained its headquarters at Rixheim, France. Jean Zuber’s wallpapers were so respected that King Louis Philippe honored him with the Legion of Honor in 1834.

Jacqueline Kennedy on recommendation of historian Henry Francis du Pont had an antique copy of the panoramic wallpaper Vue de l’Amérique du Nord,  installed in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House. The wallpaper had been on the walls of a parlor in the Federal period Jones House in Maryland until 1961 when the house was demolished for a grocery store. Just before the demolition, the wallpaper was salvaged and sold to the White House.
Zuber & Cie collection at Cooper Hewitt: http://collection.cooperhewitt.org/people/18043983/ Jean Zuber et Cie is the last manufacturer in the world to produce woodblock printed wallpapers and furnishing fabrics. Since its founding in 1797 by Jean Zuber, Zuber & Cie has maintained its headquarters at Rixheim, France. Jean Zuber’s wallpapers were so respected that King Louis Philippe honored him with the Legion of Honor in 1834.

Jacqueline Kennedy on recommendation of historian Henry Francis du Pont had an antique copy of the panoramic wallpaper Vue de l’Amérique du Nord,  installed in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House. The wallpaper had been on the walls of a parlor in the Federal period Jones House in Maryland until 1961 when the house was demolished for a grocery store. Just before the demolition, the wallpaper was salvaged and sold to the White House.
Zuber & Cie collection at Cooper Hewitt: http://collection.cooperhewitt.org/people/18043983/

Jean Zuber et Cie is the last manufacturer in the world to produce woodblock printed wallpapers and furnishing fabrics. Since its founding in 1797 by Jean Zuber, Zuber & Cie has maintained its headquarters at Rixheim, France. Jean Zuber’s wallpapers were so respected that King Louis Philippe honored him with the Legion of Honor in 1834.

Jacqueline Kennedy on recommendation of historian Henry Francis du Pont had an antique copy of the panoramic wallpaper Vue de l’Amérique du Nord,  installed in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House. The wallpaper had been on the walls of a parlor in the Federal period Jones House in Maryland until 1961 when the house was demolished for a grocery store. Just before the demolition, the wallpaper was salvaged and sold to the White House.

Zuber & Cie collection at Cooper Hewitt: http://collection.cooperhewitt.org/people/18043983/

Nabokov’s Pale Fire appears (upper right corner) on Theodore Twombly’s booshelf in the Spike Jonze film Her.

Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house Botsford house

theparisreview:

Watch Orson Welles’s 1962 film adaptation of Kafka’s The Trial. (via)

My mind was so thoroughly blown the first time I saw THE TRIAL (Brattle Theater, Cambridge, circa 1999) that I went back the next night and watched it again.

indypendenthistory:

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Trafalgar Square on the Day of the Coronation of George VI, 1937